Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College

Description

The Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College grew out of and expanded on the mission of the esteemed Broadmoor Art Academy, established in 1919, to become one of the only multi-discipline arts institutions in the nation.Today we remain an amazing rarity — a museum, theatre and art school, essentially an entire arts district, under one roof. And we go well beyond what you’d consider the boundaries of those disciplines, offering special performances in our galleries, stand-up comedy and concerts in our theaters, epic parties in our Smith Family Gallery, and insider perks for our members that take them inside the process of creating the arts.

Activations

Amos Kennedy and the Press at Colorado College exhibition
2
Feb
Activation

Amos Kennedy and the Press at Colorado College exhibition

Description should be: Amos Kennedy is a letterpress printer based in Detroit. His work explores the different ways that hand-printed posters can be a means of public expression – for individuals, for organizations doing social justice work, and for communities. Amos will teach a workshop at The Press at Colorado College and the Bemis School of Art. The letterpress posters produced in that workshop will become part of an installation in the Hybl Gallery
February 2, 2019
Public Program
Church & State theatre production
2
Nov
Activation

Church & State theatre production

Church & State is a fast-paced dramedy about faith, politics and “The Twitter.” Three days before Charles Whitmore’s Senate re-election, he decides to finally tell the public exactly what’s on his mind, no filter. What could possibly go wrong? This look at how religion, guns and social media influence our political system is simultaneously funny, heartbreaking and uplifting.
November 2, 2018
Public Program
Desert ArtLAB: Ecologies of Resistance exhibition
13
Oct
Activation

Desert ArtLAB: Ecologies of Resistance exhibition

Desert ArtLAB is an interdisciplinary art collaborative, established by museum curator/educator April Bojorquez (Chicana/Rarámuri) and artist/educator Matthew Garcia (Chicano). The collaborative reconceptualizes desert/dryland ecologies not as post-apocalyptic growth of wasteland, but as an ecological opportunity. The exhibition Ecologies of Resistance illustrates the artistic process of the collaborative’s site-specific ecological installation in the high desert of Southern Colorado through the use of artifacts, archival materials, and botanical samples. The collaborative is transforming a plot of blighted land into a thriving dryland ecosystem that also serves as an edible indigenous landscape. Informed by social sculpture, the collaborative believes artists have the ability to altruistically transform and shape their environments and society. Regrowing indigenous ecologies in community space allows for the revitalization of ecological practice and a reimagining of an indigenous dryland cosmology and aesthetic.
October 13, 2018
Exhibition
Jaune Quick-to-See Smith: In the Footsteps of My Ancestors exhibition
27
Oct
Activation

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith: In the Footsteps of My Ancestors exhibition

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith is one of the U.S.’s finest indigenous talents and a late-career artist with extraordinary aesthetic, intellectual and curatorial achievements to her credit. Coming of age when Abstract Expressionism with its white male tenor dominated, Smith pushed back and developed a strong personal vision forged from belonging to two marginalized groups by birth (female and Native American) and one by choice (non-urban), aligning them more closely with the mainstream art world. This exhibition mines Smith’s cross-cultural experience and Salish-Kootenai identity and demonstrates the evolution of her lifelong aesthetic investigations in which she simultaneously questions and creates American history. In the Footsteps of My Ancestors examines themes that perennially recur in Smith’s work, including conflict, compassion, peace, the cycle of life, irony, and identity. The artist has always operated on a cusp – culturally, temporally, aesthetically, and from a gender perspective – which gives her work an attention-getting vitality, originality, and relevance. Her role in the shift toward deepening respect for Native American contemporary art cannot be understated, and her work is at once earthy, vibrant, sophisticated, and compassionate.
October 27, 2018
Exhibition
Nora Naranjo Morse: Remembering
23
Feb
Activation

Nora Naranjo Morse: Remembering

Throughout her career, Nora Naranjo Morse’s artworks have addressed the commodification of indigenous culture. In her new project, “Remembering,” she appropriates the billboards in the Southwest to disrupt commercial advertising. Her billboards promote the protection of the sacredness of life. This exhibition will present her billboard project and recent sculpture. Make sure to check out Nora Naranjo Morse’s off-site billboard project, Remembering. Billboards will be located at 333 E Fillmore from Oct. 1-Dec. 23 and 220 W Cimarron from Oct. 29-Dec. 23.
February 23, 2019
Billboard
Virgil Ortiz: Revolution – Rise Against the Invasion exhibition
6
Oct
Activation

Virgil Ortiz: Revolution – Rise Against the Invasion exhibition

For nearly two decades, Virgil Ortiz has told the story of the 1680 Pueblo Revolt through his artwork, and simultaneously makes it more relevant and engaging to the next generation by using contemporary art to blend historic events with sci-fi fantasy – think Star Wars, Prometheus, The Avengers, and Justice League. His material choices and techniques draw from the past, while his imagery is both ultramodern and futuristic. Ortiz’s Revolt storyline transports the viewer back more than 300 years to the historical events of the 1680 Pueblo Revolt, and then hurtles forward through time to the year of 2180 – introducing a cast of characters along the way. Though the narrative will be largely based on the Revolt 1680/2180 storyline that the artist has been developing for some time, Revolution will focus on the Aeronauts and other main Revolt characters: Po’Pay, Translator and the Spirit World Army, Tahu and her army of Blind Archers, Runners, and Gliders. Set in the future of 2180, the pueblos are in chaos, the invasion of Native land continues, the scourge of war rages everywhere. The Aeronauts summon their fleet and prepare for extreme warfare against the invading Castilian forces. Desperately, the Aeronauts search for any remaining clay artifacts from the battlefields. They know that challenges and persecution will continue, so it is imperative to preserve and protect their clay, culture, language, and traditions from extinction.
October 6, 2018
Exhibition

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